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Transport of archaeological finds 

In the context of an archaeological excavation, Mainfreight Special Services arranged the transport of 155 cases with archaeological finds from Epse to Nijmegen, to the archaeological project office Auxilia of Radboud University.

The finds come from a Roman fort, built around the beginning of our era and date back to around 275 AD. Stood along the A12 at Utrecht. The fort was part of a chain of forts along the Rhine.
In Roman times, the Rhine flowed approximately below the A12 and formed the northwest border of the Roman Empire for a long time.

The archaeological finds will be investigated, catalogued and the results published in a report in the coming period. The results and the findings will make an important contribution to a new visitor centre to be established in Utrecht.

Archaeological findings

The boxes, weighing between 25 kg and 40 kg each, were loaded with the necessary care and precision, after which the goods were delivered the same day in Nijmegen. In total, almost six tons of archaeological goods were transported by Mainfreight Special Services.

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